Home > Best Sellers >

Sustainability and Eco-Responsibility - Advances in the Cosmetic Industry



 
Alternative Views:


List Price: $95.00
Our Price: $95.00

Product Code: 9780820601861

Description
 
Sustainability and Eco-Responsibility - Advances in the Cosmetic Industry
(Harrys Cosmeticology 9th Ed.)

ISBN-13/EAN: 9780820601861
Book - Paperback
Pub Date: Nov 2015
106 pages

Part 12 Sustainability and Eco-Responsibility

Editor: Alban Muller (President, Alban Muller Group)

Authors: Jamie Pero Parker (Innovation Manager, RTI International)
Phil Watson (Technology Commercialization Manager, RTI International)
Michael J. Balick (Vice President of Botanical Sciences, Director of the Institute of Economic Botany, New York Botanical Gardens)
Genevive Bridenne (CIO, Alban Muller Group)
Jean-Marc Seigneuret (Technical Director, Alban Muller Group)
Roberto Dal Toso (R&D Manager IRB SpA)
Features
The new 9th edition of Harry’s Cosmeticology is available as a 3 volume set containing over 2600 pages of new information on the recent changes in the cosmetic and personal care industry.

Chemical Publishing is now offering key parts of the title for those interested in a particular subject area covered in the book.

Harry’s Cosmeticology 9th Edition has developed a new line of “Focus Books” for this purpose.

Focus books are a series of selected chapters that can be used as a reference guide for a particular subject area.

This focus book covers:

Part 12 Sustainability and Eco-Responsibility

Part 12.0 A Global Approach for the Cosmetic and Personal Care Industry

Editor's Overview
Alban Muller (President, Alban Muller Group)

Part 12.1 Defining Sustainability and how it changes the innovation process

Authors:

Jamie Pero Parker (Innovation Manager, RTI International) and
Phil Watson (Technology Commercialization Manager, RTI International)

12.1.1 Sustainability a critical business issue

12.1.2 Innovation is a critical but challenging component of any sustainability strategy

a. The concept of open innovation (OI)
b. Open innovation and sustainability are synergistic
c. Transparency
d. Collaboration

12.1.3 Integration of sustainability principles into innovation practices is evolutionary

a. Six key traits of sustainable companies
b. Few companies explicitly recognize and exploit open innovation as a tool to help them on this sustainability pathway
c. Companies practice open innovation for sustainability adopt a more complete model of open innovation
d. Practical lessons can be learned from companies that have recognized the synergies between sustainability and OI

References

Part 12.2

A Botanist's view of Sustainability: Use or Abuse in the Personal Care Industry?

Author:

Michael J. Balick (Vice President of Botanical Sciences, Director of the Institute of Economic Botany, New York Botanical Gardens)

12.2.1 Introduction

12.2.2 What happens once you find a species of interest?

1. Accurate identification of botanicals
2. Understanding why the plant is used in the product, and what part or form will give the best result to the consumer
3. Truthful representation of the local uses of the plant in marketing efforts
4. Making sure the environment is not degraded as a result of harvesting botanicals
5. Ensuring that local communities are not negatively impacted by the harvest of the plant
6. Under the spirit and intent of the United Nations sponsored Convention on Biodiversity, compensation to groups and source countries where the materials and ideas were obtained

12.2.3 Sustainable production of wild-harvested products

Acknowledgments
References


Part 12.3
The Herboretum Network for promoting local cultures and biodiversity

Author:

Genevive Bridenne (CIO, Alban Muller Group)


12.3.1 Introduction

12.3.2 The Herboretum, a true open-air plant laboratory dedicated to plants used in beauty, health, and well-being

a. An area of reflection, a scientific and natural approach
b. An area of protection, a long-term commitment to the protection of plant resources

12.3.3 The Herboretum organizes themed visits of four different kinds: school groups, the general public, professionals, and organizations

12.3.4 The Herboretum Network, a unique interface between the phytocosmetic industry and biodiversity

Conclusion


Part 12.4

The advantages and potential contribution of local cultures for carbon footprint reduction

Author:

Jean-Marc Seigneuret (Technical Director, Alban Muller Group)

12.4.1 Introduction

12.4.2 The use of plants in cosmetics

12.4.3 Plant origin

a. Name and identification
b. Wild plants
c. Cultivated plants
d. Good agricultural practices

12.4.5 Plant breeding

a. Mass selection
b. Cross-breeding

12.4.6 Farming method

a. Conventional farming (sustainable farming)
b. Organic farming

12.4.7 Initial post-harvest processing

a. The fresh plant
b. Dry plants
c. Storage

Conclusion

Part 12.5

Cosmetic ingredients from plant cell cultures: A new eco-sustainable approach

Author:

Roberto Dal Toso (R&D Manager IRB SpA)

12.5.1 Introduction
12.5.2 Traditional methods of botanical sourcing
12.5.3 Advantages of plant cell cultures: the new alternative
12.5.4 Sustainability of the biotechnological approach
12.5.5 Phenylpropanoids: structure, metabolism, and functions in plants
12.5.6 Standardization, Safety, and New Possibilities
12.5.7 Bioactive properties of PP for cosmetic applications

Conclusion
References

Part 12.6
Eco-responsibility applied to plant extraction

Author:

Alban Muller (President, Alban Muller Group)

12.6.1 Sourcing the plant raw material: Cultivation is key

12.6.2 Transforming the plant into a "drug" to become a cosmetic extract raw material

12.6.3 Extraction

a. The traditional extractions
b. The separation steps
c. The concentration steps
d. The eco-responsible steps around extraction
e. After extraction and concentration: Drying
f. Control steps

12.6.4 An eco-responsible extract

12.6.5 Certification or not?
12.6.6 The GMO (Genetically Modified Organisms) parameter


12.6.7 Eco-responsibility applied to formulation

a. Oily phase
1. Oils
2. Vegetable oil and vegetable
3. Oil esters
4. Antioxidants
b. Water phase

Part 12.7

The industrial frame: Concrete, green solutions for production and waste management

Author:

Alban Muller (President, Alban Muller Group)

12.7.1 An example of an alternative, eco-friendly process for plant extraction: Zeodration, a unique eco-responsible solution to dry plant extracts

a. The principle
b. Ecological advantages

12.7.2 Water and biodiversity gardens
An original innovation: Restoring wetlands in industrial areas

a. The project's origins
b. Resources implemented
c. The return of animal biodiversity
c. A sensory environment, conducive to awareness


Share your knowledge of this product with other customers... Be the first to write a review
Download the Latest Catalog
Product Categories







Subscribe To Offers


Mobile Analytics